"Asking Permission" Mark Drury

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by BradC36, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. BradC36

    BradC36 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2016
    Posts:
    141
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Asking Permission w/Mark Drury 100% Wild Podcast - YouTube

    I thought this was a great topic and Mark gave great advice on how to get permission to hunting private land. I wanted to ask, how many of you have a hard time getting permission to hunt private land nearby? What are your strategies for gaining access to private land.
     
  2. JLS

    JLS Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Posts:
    726
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Missouri
    Buy the only store in a small farming community and let all the farmers charge their fuel......... they will come to you!

    Although the above statement is true,when I do ask for permission, I approach the land owner with confidence and make sure they know that I appreciate their time regardless of the answer!
     
  3. sethf11

    sethf11 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2015
    Posts:
    688
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    "Asking Permission" Mark Drury

    I asked at about 15 places last year and got 1 to hunt. And I hit a home run as its a 650 acre dairy farm.

    The success rate is low so asks lot of places. Of all the 14 places that said "no", they were very nice and pleasant. Matter of fact some said asks me next year. Some I even stayed and talked to for 10 minutes or so.

    It's nothing to be afraid of. Go knock and start talking to people. They are just people like you and I.

    My line of work makes this part kinda easy for me. I go to houses and talk to perfect strangers everyday about all sorts of good and bad things that happen to them in life.

    Use the experience. You will only get better and better at talking to people.

    Plus farmers are actually very nice. Just don't interrupt them when they are really busy.

    I killed a deer and the first thing I did was bring the farmer a cooler full of meat a few days later. Talk about opening the door. He thought it was the greatest thing in the world. He loved it. It really opened the door for me. We talked for like 30-40 minutes. I gained a lot of trust and he told me to go enjoy the land and do whatever I want.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  4. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2011
    Posts:
    8,433
    Likes Received:
    1,861
    Dislikes Received:
    30
    Location:
    NY
    I wonder how many hunters that aren't associated with his business ventures that mark let's hunt his land?
    Drops the mic. Close the tread.
     
  5. Swampthing

    Swampthing Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Posts:
    513
    Likes Received:
    9
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I haven't listened to the podcast, but what would Mark Drury would know about asking for hunting permission in 2016?
     
  6. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    It's not an easy thing now a days. Every body is sue happy. It's difficult for a land owner to get over the liability and being able to trust a perfect stranger on their hard earned land/families income. So show up clean cut and dressed like you care. Be respectful, compliment their land. Explain your situation. Show them you have respect for them and their property. Offer a service. Explain how safe you hunt to ease their mind; Safety harness, Life lines, cell phone, experienced....If they're on the fence about it, offer a contract that won't hold them liable.

    The land that I hunt on, the owner lives in a old historic farm house and goes through a lot of firewood. I haul a couple loads to him every year. I also offered a share of meat to him, and he only likes the tenderloin. I gladly give it.
    I'm also getting squeezed out of the property because his grandkids are getting older and in to hunting. Which is the best reason to get booted from a property. I respectfully and happily oblige to just hunt one corner of the farm, hoping that maybe he'll put a good word in for me down the road to neighboring properties.

    All in all it's just a crap shoot to getting your foot in the door.
     
  7. Shocker99

    Shocker99 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Posts:
    5,012
    Likes Received:
    5,239
    Dislikes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Southwest Illinois
    Just do what I do. First off you need to be decked out in camo from head to toe. Facepaint and all. This let's the landowner know you are a serious hunter. Next step is to put the biggest wad of chew in that your bottom lip will accept. A little beer on your breath never hurts. This tells the landowner you are an easy going recreationalist that won't cause any problems. The next thing is to politely invite yourself in for dinner. Of course after sayin "somethin smells gooooooood!". This will be taken as a compliment as well as a statement that you are well mannered and refined. After all this they are putty in your hands. Your welcome.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  8. Hillbilly Jedi

    Hillbilly Jedi Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2014
    Posts:
    2,400
    Likes Received:
    559
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Northern CA, United States
    One thing I will say is if you are allowed to hunt private land you don't own, say thank you to the property owner by offering some meat or whatever they like. My land owners don't like the meat but I buy the old guy a case of Pepsi and he's a happy camper. The locker I get to use to hang my deer costs a 12 pack of beer. Being grateful to those who help you is the right thing to do and often often forgotten in this day and age. People want something for nothing most of the time. Show your gratitude and make a friend for life.
     
  9. sethf11

    sethf11 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2015
    Posts:
    688
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    "Asking Permission" Mark Drury

    I also randomly send a $20 gift card for the local small convenient store. Just a thank you card and a gift card. That goes a long long ways. Whether he stops to get gas or buy a coffee. It's a double win for you as a hunter.

    Not only does he get the card and read it and think you are a great nice person but when he pulls it out of his pocket to spend it he thinks of you again!! Double the pleasure for $20 and a stamp!

    Tomorrow I will be bringing my land owner a $20 card, a nice size Venison roast and a nice turkey breast. I will talk with him for a good half hour and that will go so unbelievably far.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016
  10. BradC36

    BradC36 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2016
    Posts:
    141
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Just as a footnote, I hunt all private property that I do not need to ask permission for, I also don't think Mark Drury asks anybody for permission, just an interesting topic for bowhunters who DO hunt private land owned by others. I know land access is a big issue for our community nowadays, so I hope this thread is helpful to anyone who reads it.
     
  11. drslyr

    drslyr Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Posts:
    731
    Likes Received:
    194
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    western ma.
    What do you think Mark Drury would say if you asked permission to hunt his farm?
     
  12. sethf11

    sethf11 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2015
    Posts:
    688
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I'm sure he would say yes and put you in his best stand.

    I hate these "company guys" trying to relate to everyday hunters. This guy has a ton of leases he pays for and greases hands. He also may ask. But he gets permission because of who he is. Don't kid yourself.

    He does not have the same issues and barriers that the common day guy has. The common guy who works 40 hours a week, has to deal with kids, school functions, a wife, overtime, family things going on, bills piling up, etc.
     
  13. drslyr

    drslyr Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Posts:
    731
    Likes Received:
    194
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    western ma.
    Myself and many friends agree that if you take any of the big names in the tv hunting world and bring them into the state forest in ma. lets say. Give them a wk. Roll the cameras and lets see what happens. They never fail, they never wound, the coyotes never get their deer. They never lose one they can't find. I challenge any TV show hunter to come out to the berkshire mountains of massachusetts hunt for a week, film it. Do your own work and lets see what happens.
     
  14. airenlow

    airenlow Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Posts:
    2,675
    Likes Received:
    3,905
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    My success rate is about 1/100. I now have 5 properties to hunt, totalling 350 acres.
     
  15. drslyr

    drslyr Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Posts:
    731
    Likes Received:
    194
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    western ma.
    You can hunt in the berkshires of massachusetts and you can go 3 weeks and not even see a deer. However when you do see a buck he's usually a big boy, 200 plus lbs. I'm speaking of mostly public land. Its next to impossible to get private land permission.
     
  16. jvella

    jvella Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    57
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    So basically I just walk in or should I call up a guy before approaching. Are all farm lands considered "hunting land"
     
  17. JLS

    JLS Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Posts:
    726
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Missouri


    No, I would not call first as they won't have a clue who you are. Just show up but don't interrupt them if they are busy, you will have a chance to make a good first impression that way!

    All farm land is not good hunting land but you don't know till you get to check it out!
     
  18. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    And don't skip on the smaller pieces.
     
  19. Buckaholic84

    Buckaholic84 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Posts:
    110
    Likes Received:
    3
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Frederick, MD
    In my area its tought to come across land. Theres too many hunters and not enough land. Last year i must of asked 60 properties to hunt and finally came across a sweet old lady and told her id help around the house/land for the opportunity to hunt. I now mow her grass every week and do other various things for her and have xlose to 150 acres all to myself. The biggest thing is be polite and dont give up
     
  20. jvella

    jvella Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    57
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I sound like a complete newb but what is the best conversation starter? I mean if your looking to hunt can you just be up front and ask and then offer to help around the farm?
     

Share This Page