As we age......?

Discussion in 'Bowhunt or Die® - Web Show' started by CamoKoop, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. CamoKoop

    CamoKoop Newb

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    As we age; watching Bowhunting or Die web show now for over 10 years (Congrats). I, like most of your older loyal fans are facing some age related challenges. I want to be able to extend my use of my(a) bow as long as possible before having to convert to a cross bow.
    As men (and women) age it becomes more difficult to maintain strength and flexibility. What adjustments to our equipment can be performed to help us stay in our tree stands with our favorite bow as long as possible? i.e. draw weight, % of let off, etc....
     
  2. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    Welcome to the forum!

    Never stop working out or give up with status quo . A sedentary lifestyle is never a good idea for bow hunters. Keep moving!
     
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  3. SharpEyeSam

    SharpEyeSam Legendary Woodsman

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    Welcome to the Forum! As Fix said, keep moving. Strength training is key to being strong and capable as we age. I will soon be 52 (not old by any means) but I still climb trees by grabbing the branches and pulling and making my way up. I say this because so many people stop doing the things they once did and they no longer use those muscles. Stay active and use those bow shooting muscles as much as you can by shooting often and working out. Good Luck hunting this year!
     
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  4. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    What the guys said and understanding your equipment. I shoot 49#'s and know I can get clean pass throughs at 35 yrds.. That is not on an alert deer though. Not on one with it's head down able to drop faster than my arrow. So knowing your game as well. Dr Woods has some good stuff on that subject. I'm not a gym goer anymore but I do own a suspension gym which is great for your arms shoulder strength and an elliptical for your legs and cardio. Though nothing beats a daily hike, working the woods and any land you can.
     
  5. John T.

    John T. Die Hard Bowhunter

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    My son took possession of his PSE bow with 60-70 lb. draw. He was surprised as how his muscle tone had diminished, even at 60 lb.
     
  6. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    "Shooting a bow" muscles aren't ones that are used often in daily life - especially if you happen to have an office job. I've seen grown men who regularly hit the gym and are considered in good shape have a rough time drawing back a 70 lb bow. So, I would say that's totally normal. The positive note is that it seems to come back fairly quickly - for me anyways. A few arrows a night is all it takes.

    As for the original question - it's certainly something that a few guys on our team have faced in recent years. Todd has bad shoulder problems and has reduced his draw weight from 70 lbs down to 60 lbs to help compensate for that. I believe that's the quickest and easiest method for people struggling with shooting higher poundage. Keep in mind you will likely need to adjust other things - arrows (spine), sight pin gaps/sight tape, etc.

    I haven't personally seen anyone adjust letoff or move to a higher letoff bow, but that certainly wouldn't be out of the question. Being able to hold steady at full draw is an important part of archery. You may also consider lightening your setup wherever you can to help with that.

    And as everyone else has said - staying physically active, exercising, stretching, and eating right are all great ideas for all aspects of health - not just hunting. We don't all need to be Cam Hanes, but hitting the gym a few times a week, doing stretches at home, trading soda/beer for water, and getting off your butt more often are things just about anyone can do.
     
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  7. LIVIT

    LIVIT Newb

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    Due to damages I got in Military, my age had made them get worse. I can no longer hold a bow at full draw long enough to feel comfortable shooting at an animal. I finally had to make the switch to a crossbow several yrs ago. After workin in pro-shops for yrs and being a sponsored 3D shooter it was hard to go with a Xbow. I never really did like them, always thought unfair advantage etc... My opinion of that has changed. Yes my Xbow is deadly out to 75 yds or so and I have taken Yotes in a field almost that far out, but would never try a deer beyond 45 -50 yds, so same as when I was hunting with my compound. Don't let getting older or a physical disability stop ya from hunting like I did for a couple of yrs. Big mistake on my part ! Good luck and stay safe this Season.


    Center Point (Crossman) Sniper 370 inexpensive but deadly !
     
  8. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I will also add, many states that do not allow crossbows do allow them to be an option with a special permit if a Dr. is willing to sign off on your not being able to physically draw and hold a bow.
    Crossbows aren't allowed here in Idaho except for during an "any weapons" season, they aren't legal for "archery only" seasons.
    The regs do say however that if you can't draw and hold a bow due to physical disabilities, than a handicapped permit can be acquired to use a crossbow during an archery only season. I don't know the exact procedure, but a Dr. signing off that you can't use a "regular" bow is required.

    So even if crossbow's aren't allowed for archery only seasons, there may be exceptions.
     
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  9. Vabowman

    Vabowman Grizzled Veteran

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    I lift weights and run. I also don't pull 70 lbs any longer. I can very easily, however I don't want to..I will last longer that way
     
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  10. LIVIT

    LIVIT Newb

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    Tks, had forgot to mention this. Also from what I'm understanding any Disabled Vet in all states can use a Xbow if you carry your letter of disability. Here is the most recent list of Crossbow regs. I could find state by state. Of course verify any of this with your DNR first. Good luck this season.

    http://www.bestcrossbowsource.com/crossbow-hunting-regulations-by-state/
     
  11. Vabowman

    Vabowman Grizzled Veteran

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    xbows have been legal in VA for over 10 years...anyone can use one
     
  12. Bill Brubaker

    Bill Brubaker Newb

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    I'm a disabled vet (90%). When I was discharged in 2005 I could not pull a bow at all, I couldn't cast a flyrod, I couldn't endure a car trip over two hours. So I sat in a chair, depressed, for two years. Finally I decided I was either going to die in that damn chair or I was going to have to get up and go about life despite the pain. I bought a 20 lb recurve and started shooting--only a few arrows at a time for weeks, then slowly adding arrows. After a year I worked up to a thirty pound recurve. It took nearly another year to get to 40 lbs. I took my first deer with a bow, a little button buck, with that 40 lb recurve. I bought my first compound bow--second hand--and had it set at about 48 lbs. I eventually worked up to about 58 lbs. I've had setbacks--could only hunt one season in the last three--spent months in a nursing home in a wheelchair/walker. I was afraid I wouldn't be able to pull a bow at all this year and I put it off because I was afraid to find out. But September came around and one day I made myself take my bow out and give it a try---I could pull it! So I'm out again this fall with a second hand Hoyt set at 53 lbs--and with the help of a fellow vet and his quad I'm hanging stands and cameras and have some bucks showing up (nocturnal damn it!).

    You just have to want it enough to persevere despite limitations, despite pain. When I'm in a tree, I'm happy. When I'm walking down a fall trail, I'm happy. If I can pull any kind of bow, I'm happy. If I can fly fish just an hour or two I am happy. Just keep walking, keep adjusting bows and pull weights, use your upper body to keep those arms and shoulders moving--and don't be afraid to ask friends for a bit of help so that you can keep hunting, and fishing, and living.
     
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  13. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    Thank you for your service sir. Please continue to inspire and kickass.
     
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  14. muzzyman88

    muzzyman88 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    You don't have to be a gym rat or do a workout regimen to keep in shape as you get older. At 42, I'm starting to feel the effects of father time a bit, but I'm active, take care of myself for the most part and do everything I did when I was 25, maybe a little slower... haha. I work a desk job so I know all too well about how sedentary activities affect your health. Working from home because of Covid has allowed me to get out of the house for a brisk hike on the mountain every day at lunch and its does the body good for sure.


    I bought a new bow this year and opted for a 60lber intead of the normal 70. For whitetails, even Elk, there is absolutely no need for a 70lb bow anymore. They're more efficient than ever and will get the job done no problems. I figured its a good way to save wear and tear on my shoulders, etc as father time keeps marching on.
     
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  15. Vabowman

    Vabowman Grizzled Veteran

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    I shot a 60 lb bow for 2 years. I went back 70 and I honeslty can say that the 70 is just as smooth and sure does thump a lot harder. Although 60 is plenty, I can still pull 70 with ease, I lift weights 4 days a week and I am still very strong for my 46 years of age and 150 lbs. no shoulder issues at all. so I will keep pulling 70 until I just don't feel like it anymore. plus, my short 26.5" draw length doesn't give me a lot with speed, KE or MO..
     
  16. 0317

    0317 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Ive been an avid distance runner for over 44 yrs(now 63), I still run races, 5/10 k and half marathons .. I try to eat right, take some supplements, dropped some weight, dont drink, dont smoke, dont do drugs, dont eat sweets/candy a lot, if at all, dont drink sodas (just sun tea, unsweetened), but I do like my Punkin' pie with whipped cream during the holidays .... I will never use one of those damn crossbow thingys .. NEVER .... I will use a vertical/hand drawn/hand held BOW until I cant any longer, then I'll go back to firearms, there isnt any hiding what they are ...
     
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  17. Vabowman

    Vabowman Grizzled Veteran

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    the crossbow debate is really a moot point to me. I used to get in debates over them, but in the end, I really don't care what someone hunts with. Do I look at a crossbow kill differently than a vertical bow? hell yeh i do. I do believe that a vertical bow is much more difficult. with that said, I have also tried my hand at traditional hunting, and yeh, that's a hell of a lot harder than a compound. the guy that kills deer consistantly with a trad bow is way better than I am at shooting and hunting. it is the most primitive way to bow hunt. Now, I am with you. I will bowhunt as long as I can with a vertical bow. If that means pulling 40 lbs then so be it. I can't ever imagine not being able to pull 40 lbs. when I can't then I will hang it up. as the quote says " when bones have become brittle, and sinew has gone dry, we will hunt in our dreams, for the soul of a bowhunter lives on through enternity".....
     
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  18. NebMo Hunter

    NebMo Hunter Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Im 38 and feeling my age and years of a desk job. I used to walk miles oer shift when I worked in the ER. always moving, 12 hour shifts giving 4 days off a week making it easier to exercise.

    Now I drive into downtown, sit at a desk for hours on end to go home and run kids around to activities. Its hard to maintain "shape"
    6 years ago I lost 40 pounds
    over the following 6 years have gained 20 back
     
  19. Brian Walters

    Brian Walters Newb

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    One thing I would add to this is being able to pull back a certain poundage does not necessarily mean that is the correct poundage to hunt at. Pulling back a bow shooting at a target with no pressure or the elements is different than being in a tree with a live deer in front of you with cold weather and wind. Just something to think about. When time comes and I can’t comfortably pull back a poundage that I feel is required to effectively make kill shots in the stand based on the way I want to hunt (terrain, shooting distances, etc) I will switch to a crossbow no questions asked. Those are all personal preferences and will be unique to each hunter. Love the perseverance in some of these posts. Bravo and godspeed!


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  20. blackbear

    blackbear Weekend Warrior

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    Does anyone know the dangers of the cross bow, I always thought more accidents occurred, or is that shop lore.


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