Anyone us throw and grow.

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Excalibur, Dec 23, 2016.

  1. Excalibur

    Excalibur Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Posts:
    521
    Likes Received:
    376
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ohio
    Does anyone use the Throw N Grow food plot. Thought about using it as I heard it was easy to use with low maintenance. I was going tonuse it as a late season plot as my areas has farm land on both sides. What is everyone's thoughts and experience.

    Your neighborhood Bow Hunter
     
  2. JStarr

    JStarr Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Posts:
    213
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, Indiana
    In my opinion.
    I'll start off with "it's not what you plant, it's where you plant it."

    Throw n grow is okay if you just throw it on the ground. Some of it will grow.

    If you break up the ground a little bit and throw some lime over the top and mix it in. It will do a lot better.
    I tend to use the throw and grow as a "trail liner." Lining the sides of the trails leading to and from bedding areas and along the edges of the trails to and from my stands.

    I don't have the ground or the equipment to plant big food plots, so this is what I do to try and keep them on their feet a little longer in the mornings and evenings.
     
  3. w33kender

    w33kender Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2016
    Posts:
    1,101
    Likes Received:
    538
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Ash, NC (but I hunt SC)
    You can get better results getting three pounds of crimson clover at the nearest mom and pop seed and feed store.
     
  4. SharpEyeSam

    SharpEyeSam Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Posts:
    10,834
    Likes Received:
    330
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Like JStarr said, Thro n Gro does well if you break up the ground first..
     
  5. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Posts:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    698
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Apex, North Carolina
    It's all about seed to soil contact no matter what you plant. I plant a plot with a seed blend and only about 50% came up. I broadcasted AntlerKing NoSweat and it filled the plot in. The good thing with NoSweat here in North Carolina and Virginia is that it will be green through April or until the summer heat kills it.

    Bottom line is if you put some effort into it most will do fairly well. Effort equals to at least raking all debris from the site so the seed contacts the soil. Add some lime and fertilizer and all should be good.
     
  6. Excalibur

    Excalibur Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2016
    Posts:
    521
    Likes Received:
    376
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ohio
    Thanks for all the advise guys. With the land I hunt on I got crops on the east and west sides of the woods, so thinking about this now I don't think a small quaternary acre food plot would be able to compete with the larger farm crops of soy beans and corn. What they don't have is mineral sites. I've had some local hunters say to use swamp donkey and one said to use trophy rock. So now with much thinking, mineral sites or small food plots that is the question.

    Your friendly neighborhood Bow Hunter
     
  7. Keep_Calm_And_Bowhunt

    Keep_Calm_And_Bowhunt Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Posts:
    77
    Likes Received:
    1
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cherryville, North Carolina
    I did the other year, and it seemed to work alright. It has some kind of seed in it that looks like a radish when it first comes up. But it will grow probably 4 feet tall and have pods of seeds like peas. Just let nature take its course and they will spread.
    Like I said, I planted it the year before last and there is still stuff coming up and the deer do seem to like it. Just remember to plant it where it can get lots of sun. I didn't think about it when I did and put it too close to the wood line so I wasted about half the bag
     
  8. DrSnake

    DrSnake Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2016
    Posts:
    132
    Likes Received:
    10
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Really, you may want to think of it as providing something that is not there. If there are regular crops, maybe a late season food plot. A mineral site. Or even a tub of water.

    Planting a food plot with soybeans isn't effective when there are 200 acres of them nearby.
     
  9. DVO

    DVO Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2014
    Posts:
    278
    Likes Received:
    28
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pines
    I used Whitetail Institute's version this year. Bought a house with 27 fully wooded acres and moved in June 29th. Started cutting in a food plot in an area that wasn't super thick. I had to put in about 40 hours of back breaking work to get a 1/10 acre cleared. I threw down a bag of 10-10-10 fertilizer when I planted and it grew decently. Deer ate it but it didn't pull a lot of deer in.
    IMG_7526.JPG
     
  10. usmc0317

    usmc0317 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    May 12, 2015
    Posts:
    104
    Likes Received:
    49
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    IMG_2340.jpg
    unnamed.jpg
    unnamed (14).jpg

    We have a major pinch point in our river bottom where the woods is about 150yds wide. It probably gets about 40% sunlight through the day and the ground stays a little spongy all the time. We wanted to carve out a little plot to give deer an added reason to stop when passing through. We created a little plot by just cutting some brush and raking as best we could, not really knowing if anything would grow at all in there. We decided to go with what we thought would handle those conditions the best (White Dutch Clover, Ladino Clover, Hiafa Clover, Purple Top Turnips, and a little chicory & winter wheat mixed in) It ended up turning out better than we thought. 1st pic is before any work was done, 2nd is after our initial clearing in the spring, 3rd after weed wacking and spraying one more time in August this is what it looked like in November.
     
    zachd likes this.
  11. Shocker99

    Shocker99 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Posts:
    4,801
    Likes Received:
    4,907
    Dislikes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Southwest Illinois
    We used some on a logging road this year. It came up nice. Can't find the pics but it was a carpet


    Sent from my iPhone using Bowhunting.com Forums
     
  12. DrSnake

    DrSnake Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2016
    Posts:
    132
    Likes Received:
    10
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I used it on a small 1/4 acre plot. I used round up first, then hand raked, put it down, racked again. No water was available, but got some rain that week. I'd say I got about 30-40% germination and what sprouted grew well. I'd say was acceptable.
     
  13. Xoutdoors

    Xoutdoors Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Posts:
    577
    Likes Received:
    18
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MINNESOTA
    Throw and grow is mostly ryegrass. I'd prefer the whitetail institute no plow or secret spot. More brasicas and anual clovers
     

Share This Page