Any suggestions?

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by iHunt, Mar 16, 2011.

  1. iHunt

    iHunt Grizzled Veteran

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    I have decided I am putting a food plot in our pasture this year. I cut a bunch of cedars and locust trees this afternoon, and mowed the grass down as best I could with our JD riding mower. I am going to pick up something to spray the grass and shrubs with tomorrow, then burn it off when the neighbor burns his pasture.

    My question is, what should I plant there? I have not taken a pH test yet, I have just recently gotten serious about this. But based on assumptions, any suggestions? It has always just been pasture land, grown up with cedars and locusts and native grasses. This is not a very big spot, maybe 90ish feet by 50ish feet (for now, I might cut more tomorrow).

    Another thing is, I don't have access to a plow or disk right now. I am going to ask around and see if I can borrow one or have someone come disk/plow for me. So far, I have been planning on Throw N Grow for the plot, but that can change based on everyone's thoughts and suggestions.

    Here is a pic of the plot. The orange outline is what I cut and mowed today, and the green is what I am thinking about cutting and mowing tomorrow. The blue is a pond that is close by, I'm hoping this combination keeps the deer out of the field to the SW for the most part. I have been having some problems with poaching and spotlighting at night.

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  2. Rutin

    Rutin Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I would base it off of what is being grown around you crop wise. If theres a ton of corn then plant a green on green.... do clover and beans.... leave the beans standing all year,
    if its going to be beans this year then do clover and corn, brassicas are always nice for late season but corn is always a good cover also. I would say with the draw to the west and the natraul pinch to the south, i would plant corn on the north plot and beans on the south. Since you have an early archery season plant the beans late and they will still be nice and green and should draw tons of deer. Just my two cents.....
     
  3. Hoyt 'N' It

    Hoyt 'N' It Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I agree do a combo of clover, and something that the deer will have for late season as well, remember cole, that looks like a location where you will need a seed that requires alot of sun. There are alot of no till seeds out there these days. Evolved harvest and imperial are 2 companies that do this, check them out and keep us posted. Might not be a bad idea to get soil test to check PH, and all that fun stuff. Good luck bud!
     
  4. iHunt

    iHunt Grizzled Veteran

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    Thanks for the input guys. I am thinking about a spring and a fall plot in this spot, as I am pretty sure I will clear out the orange section on Sunday. I think my biggest hurdle will be getting equipment to break up the ground, even if I use the no till seed. We have a roto tiller, but it will need a full on restoration before it is usable again.

    If I had to guess, I would say the closest fields will be corn this year. What about planting a section of clover and beans with a few brassicas mixed in, and a section of corn (like in the green section)?
     
  5. Rutin

    Rutin Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Not all of us have to luxury of Lee & Tiff with all the equipment..... So save yourself the visit to the chiropractor and rent a tractor and tiller for the day from a local equipment store. Should cost about $150-$200 for a one day rental and you'll have it done in no time. Just go back and mow it down, spray round up and let it set for 4days, then rent a tractor w/ tiller and make your plot. If your going to have corn around you, then this little plot should have no corn, I would do a green on green, I would plant clover and beans. Even after the beans turn leave them up all year... trust me once the corn is down you will have deer showing up you've never seen, I would plant 1/3 in clover, 2/3 in beans!
     
  6. Rutin

    Rutin Die Hard Bowhunter

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    p.s. do a soil test, lime & fertilize or you'll waste your time & money
     
  7. iHunt

    iHunt Grizzled Veteran

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    Thanks for your help. I hope to be able to get some time this weekend or this coming week for a soil test.

    I'm just a 20 year old college kid full of enthusiasm, but not as much know how :D
     
  8. Rutin

    Rutin Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Right there with you brother, 25 yrs old and ATE UP!!! Talk to local farmer and buy round up ready beans, see if they order extra if you can buy some bulk off them.... ALOT cheaper. Same with clover.... dont spend 3x as much on "deer hunting" clover when you can go to tsc or a grain mill and buy pounds of it dirt cheap.
     

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