3rd set

Discussion in 'Target Archery' started by Artem256, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Here’s my 3rd set, well half set of arrows I made.
    For fun Im calling them Atlantean.
     

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  2. BowhunterX

    BowhunterX Newb

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    How long does it take to make one?
     
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  3. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    For one Id say erm about a hour or two depending on what youre making.
     
  4. John T.

    John T. Weekend Warrior

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    Odd shaped vanes. Any particular reason for this? Shaft material? Curious.
     
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  5. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    They’re “fantasy” shaped I cut from full length feathers. No reason really just fit to the Atlantean theme so to speak. Shaft is ash wood.
     
  6. John T.

    John T. Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks. I remember when all arrows were Port Orford cedar.
     
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  7. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    I plan to try and test various woods to see what looks, and handles the best
     
  8. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Looks nice. I use to go for more "flashy" colors, my arrows tend to hide in grass, dirt of dry leaves sometimes.
    Aren't that same kind of "speed nocks" ?
    There is no winding at the fletching, so I suppose you shoot them over a shelf (no prim bow or horsebow).
     
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  9. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks! They’re vermil V speed nocks, i havnt tried winding yet, the remaining 6 I was going to try it. I have shot unwound arrows off my horsebow, I know not ideal but lol I had just started building arrows.
     
  10. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    You don't really need windings of the fletchings. But I can tell you from experience it hurts less when you have it ...
    The quill can make quite bloody cuts, and once I had a barb pushed under the skin of my hand, about almost an inch long. Pulling it out didn't feel ... nice.
    Windings will not prevent scatches or blood, but make it much less severe.
    BTW, the reason is usually a too low nocking point.

    You can do it anytime later, even with finished arrows.
    And there are decent tutorials on YT, the ELB shooters use to do it as well.
     
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  11. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Heh I got a nasty feather cut from some of the cheapo amazon arrows I had bought when I first started shooting the recurve. Those has windings. I was thinking of doing a gold/brass winding on the blue arrows.
     
  12. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Hmmm, seems you have plenty of extra money, to spend on gold windings ... ;-)
    I usually use cotton thread, then paint it (sometimes) and seal it with waterproof wood glue.
    I usually cover only the front of the fletching, which has the nasty habit of cutting through my hand.
     
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  13. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Hahahaha I wish I was that rich
     
  14. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Going to post some photos of arrows I made, hopefully today.
    The one's I made last night were crap ;-(
     
  15. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Here some of my arrows. Each one from a series of six to twelve pieces I made the last two years.
    The left two are bamboo with self nocks (which is a PITA to make). Albeit for relatively low draw weights, the nock area is reinforced with a winding.
    The next three are basically the same shaft (50..55# cedar, 11/32", 32"), only different fletchings and cresting. The fletching of the left one (red/black with matching fletches) are bigger because it has a broadhead tip.
    The next three are the same shaft again (35..40# cedar, 5/16", 32"), for my 30# and 35# bows I use mostly.
    Looking more closely, one might realize some already served as lawn dart ...
     

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  16. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Nice nice, They look good! I havnt tried self nocks yet, I was going to try that out on my next set. I know the basic run down of it, havnt tried it yet.
     
  17. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    With wooden shafts, self nocks are not too difficult. I use a tile saw (3mm) to cut the slot, and key files + sand paper to work the nock shape.
    With a bit of technical skill, you can even make "click on" self nocks, like the plastice one's.
    For better durability and consistency, make the nock cut at 90° (right angle) to the annual rings.
    This applies to plastic nocks too, the spine of wooden shafts varies with rotational orientation.

    Bamboo is quite hard and tends to split, you need metal working tools.
    And it is a hollow pipe, you need to fortify the ends (glueing in a wood pin).
    The advantage - a hollow pipe is more mechanicall robust, and because it is the whole "stem/branch", all fibers are parallel, without annual rings.
    And the bare shaft has naturally a significant FOC. This makes the arrow more stable, even with smaller tip weight.
     
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  18. Artem256

    Artem256 Weekend Warrior

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    Definitely good to know, thanks! Working the nock into shape is what Ill need practice with, all part of the fun!
     
  19. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    You could try self nocks with remains of old/destroyed shafts, before doing actual arrows.
    Happy I did the same recently with etching steel ...
     

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