3 degrees of helical is the magic number

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by BB4tw, Mar 3, 2016.

  1. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    According to the article below, an arrow fletched with a 3 degree helical will out perform any other fletching configuration (I assume that they used matching shafts, equipment, etc.). 5 degrees of helical is over kill, offset and straight fletch doesn't stabilize nearly as well. The claim is that the finding apply across vane types and styles.

    It's a good read.

    The Bowhunting Pioneers Were Right: Helical Fletching Is Most Accurate | Outdoor Life
     
  2. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Did they test quick spins in there?
     
  3. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    They didn't specifically name Quick Spins as being tested. However, they did say that the extra spin from a 5 degree helical didn't provide any meaningful amount of stabilization over the slower spin of the 3 degree. Furthermore the faster spin caused the arrows to drop faster.

    Whether the same findings would be seen when using Quick Spins, I don't know.
     
  4. rick-florida

    rick-florida Weekend Warrior

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    great article, thanks
     
  5. blueicefire

    blueicefire Weekend Warrior

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    My 3 degree arrows way out perform my "stock" built arrows. My wife bought me a fletching machine and I did some of the arrows myself with and then left the other the same. Night / Day difference. Will never purchase "stock" fletching again, I'll do it myself.
     
  6. Rangerdan

    Rangerdan Weekend Warrior

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    Check out Podcast number 11 of Nock On archery ITunes Podcast or Podbean. John Dudley interviews James Park, who is a Aussie Archery guru and Physicist. This answers allot of these up in the air questions regarding aerodynamics of arrows, fletching's, nocks etc. Its worth the listen!
     
  7. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    This is something that archers with practical experiences have known for years.
     
  8. scarps23

    scarps23 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Great article. Just bought a fletching jig and started using the helical. Haven't shot any arrows yet. Really curious to see if I can tell a difference at longer distances.
     
  9. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    The part about the helical providing more stability in flight didn't surprise me at all. What did surprise me was their finding that the 5 degree was "over kill" and actually detrimental to the overall shot.
     
  10. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I just started using the Arizona EZ Fletch mini and I think it puts a 6 degree helical on it. Granted that's what it says but I don't think it is quite 6 degrees.
     
  11. DoubleLung84

    DoubleLung84 Weekend Warrior

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    I have a bitzenberger Jig ...how would I know what degree helical I am putting on my arrow?
     
  12. DD/MO

    DD/MO Weekend Warrior

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    Cool. Just bought a Tower Jig. Looking forward to giving it a try.
     
  13. Swise660

    Swise660 Weekend Warrior

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    I have the same question.
     
  14. rick-florida

    rick-florida Weekend Warrior

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    I use a bitzenberger and have done a lot of experimentation with various vanes and feathers with different levels of helical offset. Am not sure my exact offset but basically use about midway from the max I can set and no offset. the arrows have flown great with all the fixed blade broadheads I've tried including single, three blade and four blade. I normally use white and yellow or white and orange RAZR 2 inch feathers which really show up when they fly and those set at max offset were amazing to watch because they spun like a top as they flew to the target. Flying like a dart is the only way to describe them. I know this doesn't help answer the question of how to tell how much offset is set. My recommendation would be to fletch a couple arrows with an angle that between none and max offset and try it, then adjust it from there based on the arrow's flight. the bitzenberger does have markings on it to use as a reference but I've not taken the time to figure out how these relate to degree of offset.
     
  15. rick-florida

    rick-florida Weekend Warrior

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    Using old school math it looks like 2 inch fletching would have an 3 degree of offset if the front of the fletching was .052 inch off the arrow centerline from the back. 3 inch would be .078 inch and 4 inch .104 inch.

    4 degree offset would be .069, .104, and .139.

    5 degree offset would be .087, .130, and .174.

    the offset I've been putting on my 2 inch fletching is .063 so it's close to 4 degrees.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2016

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